Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)


 

What is an MRI?

An MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is a diagnostic test that uses a large magnet and radiowaves. The magnet creates a strong magnetic field in the body. The radiowaves are beamed into the magnetic field and the changes in the magnetic field are measured and sent to a computer. The computer then uses this information to construct a picture.

The MRI will take 45 to 60 minutes.

You will be lying on a table that will move. It is very important to lie perfectly still so that the pictures are not blurred. The table will move through the center of the machine which resembles a long "tunnel.” While the MRI is being done, the machine makes a lot of noise (rattling and banging).

Test preparation

No preparation or restrictions are necessary.

Special instructions

If you have a pacemaker, you will not be able to have an MRI because the magnet interferes with the pacing of the pacemaker.

Notify the tech or physician if you have an aneurysm clip, or any type of prosthesis or metal object, including shrapnel, in your body. Also, let them know if you become uncomfortable in closed-in spaces.

You may be asked to remove any jewelry before the test.


 
  • Email
  • Print
  • Share
  • Text
Highlight Glossary Terms