Pediatric Leukemia Clinical Trials

Showing 1-10 of 10 items
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  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia
  • This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well giving combination chemotherapy with or without rituximab works in treating younger patients with stage III or stage IV non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibody, such as rituximab, can block cancer cells growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether giving combination chemotherapy together with rituximab is more effective in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Oncology, Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
3.
  • SC-PEG Asparaginase vs. Oncaspar in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) and Lymphoblastic Lymphoma
  • This study is being conducted to learn about the effects of SC-PEG, which is a new form of a chemotherapy drug called asparaginase. Asparaginase is used to treat ALL and lymphoblastic lymphoma. The standard form of asparaginase, called Elspar, is given in the muscle once a week for 30 weeks. There are other forms of asparaginase. The investigators will be studying two of these: Oncaspar and Calaspargase Pegol (SC-PEG). The investigators have previously studied giving Oncaspar in the vein (instead of the muscle) every 2 weeks in patients with ALL, and have shown that this dosing did not lead to any more side effects than Elspar given weekly in the muscle. The study drug, SC-PEG, is very similar but not identical to Oncaspar. SC-PEG has been given in the vein to children and adolescents with ALL as part of other research studies, and it appears to last longer in the blood after a dose than Oncaspar. It has not yet been approved by the FDA. The goal of this research study is to learn whether the side effects and drug levels of SC-PEG given in the vein every 3 weeks are similar to Oncaspar given into the vein about every 2 weeks. The study will also help to determine whether changing treatment for children and adolescents with ALL with high levels of minimal residual disease may improve cure rates. Measuring minimal disease (MRD) is a laboratory test that finds low levels of leukemia cells that the investigators cannot see under the microscope. In the past, it has been shown that children and adolescents with ALL with high levels of MRD after one month of treatment are less likely to be cured than those with low levels of MRD. Therefore, on the study, the bone marrow and blood at the end of the first month of treatment will be measured in participants with leukemia, and changes in therapy will be implemented based on this measurement. It is not known for sure that changing treatment will improve cure rates. MRD levels can only be measured if the marrow is filled with cancer cells at the time of diagnosis. Therefore, MRD studies will only be done in children and adolescents with ALL and not in those with lymphoblastic lymphoma. Another part of the study is to determine whether giving antibiotics during the first month of treatment even to participants without fever will prevent serious infections in the blood and other parts of the body. About 25% of children and adolescents with ALL and lymphoblastic lymphoma who receive standard treatment develop a serious blood infection from a bacteria during the first month of treatment. Typically, antibiotics (medicines that fight bacteria) are given by vein only after a child with leukemia or lymphoma develops a fever or have other signs of infection. In this study, antibiotics will be given by mouth or in the vein to all participants during the first month of treatment, whether or not they develop fever. Another goal of the study to learn how vitamin D levels relate to bone problems (such as broken bones or fractures) that children and adolescents with ALL and lymphoblastic lymphoma experience while on treatment. Some of the chemotherapy drugs used to treat ALL and lymphoblastic lymphoma can make bones weaker, which make fractures more likely. Vitamin D is a natural substance from food and sunlight that can help keep bones strong. The investigators will study how often participants have low levels of vitamin D while receiving chemotherapy, and, for those with low levels, whether giving vitamin D supplements will increase those levels. Another focus of the study is to learn more about the biology of ALL and lymphoblastic lymphoma by doing research on blood, bone and spinal fluid bone marrow samples. The goal of this research is to improve treatment for children with leukemia in the future.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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  • Phase I Trial of the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export, KPT-330, in Relapsed Childhood ALL and AML
  • This research study involves participants who have acute lymphoblastic or acute myelogenous leukemia that has relapsed or has become resistant (or refractory) to standard therapies. This research study is evaluating a drug called KPT-330. Laboratory and other studies suggest that the study drug, KPT-330, may prevent leukemia cells from growing and may lead to the destruction of leukemia cells. It is thought that KPT-330 activates cellular processes that increase the death of leukemia cells. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the side effects of KPT-330 when it is administered to children and adolescents with relapsed or refractory leukemia.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
6.
  • Everolimus With Multiagent Re-Induction Chemotherapy in Pediatric Patients With ALL
  • Laboratory and other studies suggest that, the study drug, Everolimus (RAD001), may prevent tumor cell growth and also may increase the efficacy of other chemotherapy drugs. Everolimus is approved for use in the United States for certain types of cancer, such as kidney cancer. It has been extensively studied in people with various types of cancer as a single agent (a drug that is used alone to treat the cancer) or in combination with a number of other drugs. Studies in adults with cancer have also evaluated Everolimus in combination with other anti-tumor drugs. Information from lab studies and some other clinical trials suggests that Everolimus may kill leukemia cells on its own, and also make it more likely that steroids (such as prednisone) are able to kill leukemia cells. In this research study, we are looking to learn more about how Everolimus works in combination with other drugs which are commonly used to treat relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (prednisone, vincristine, PEG-asparaginase, and doxorubicin). The main goal of the study is to evaluate the side effects of this treatment combination in order to determine a safe dose of Everolimus which can be given with these other 4 drugs.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
7.
  • A Study Of Panobinostat In Children With Refractory Hematologic Malignancies
  • This study is for patients with relapsed or refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML), Hodgkin's Disease (HD) or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL). Panobinostat is a new drug that is considered investigational because it has not been approved in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), or in any other country. Panobinostat is a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) and interferes with gene expression found in cells causing them to stop growing or die. Panobinostat has been used in several hundred adults who had leukemia, HD, NHL and other solid tumors. Panobinostat has not been given to children. This is a phase I study. In a phase I study, drugs are tested to the highest dose that can be safely given. Drugs are given at gradually increasing dosages until there are unacceptable side effects. The goal of the Phase I study is to find out the dose of panobinostat that can be safely given to children with relapsed ALL, AML, HD and NHL.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
8.
  • Dose Escalation Study of EPZ-5676 in Pediatric Patients With Leukemias Bearing a Rearrangement of the MLL Gene
  • A subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) harbor rearrangements of the MLL gene, which are detected either by cytogenetic or fluorescent in situ hybridization evaluation at the time of diagnosis. A protein called DOT1L plays an important role in the malignant process in these leukemias. EPZ-5676 is a molecule that blocks the activity of DOT1L, and is therefore being evaluated in the treatment of patients with MLL-rearranged leukemias.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
9.
  • A Safety Study of SGN-CD19A for Leukemia and Lymphoma
  • This is a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation, multicenter study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of SGN-CD19A in adult and pediatric patients with relapsed or refractory B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), Burkitt lymphoma or leukemia, or B-lineage lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LBL).
  • Diagnoses: Leukemia/MDS, Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
10.
  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia
  • RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
  • Diagnoses: Pediatric Leukemia
  • Status: Recruiting
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