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Breast Cancer Clinical Research and Trials

  • Sara Tolaney, MD, MPH (left), Margaret Haldoupis, RN, and Ian Krop, MD, PhD

    Sara Tolaney, MD, MPH (left), Margaret Haldoupis, RN, and Ian Krop, MD, PhD, plan clinical trials for breast cancer

  • We believe outstanding clinical care is directly linked to an active program of clinical research. Our physician-scientists take the questions that arise in their clinical practices, answer them through clinical trials, and take this new knowledge back to the clinic where it can immediately benefit patients.

    Breast cancer investigators are tackling cancer on multiple fronts, including immunotherapy and targeted treatments for the three subtypes: hormone receptor positive, HER2-positive, and triple-negative. This work includes primary tumors and metastatic cancer.

    We offer our breast cancer patients access to more than 40 clinical trials at a time — many of which are changing the standard of care worldwide and are not available elsewhere. Our clinical trials focus on the types and phases of your disease so therapy can be targeted to your type of breast cancer.

    Our clinical trial finder provides an easy way to search for a clinical trial in breast cancer. Although this tool is currently geared for physicians, patients can benefit from while a patient-friendly version is being developed.

  • Clinical Trial Summaries

    Dana-Farber's Breast Oncology Center is launching an effort to provide summaries of the results of its clinical trials in an easy-to-read format. These summaries highlight recently published clinical trial results, as well as resources for more information.

    Thank you to everyone who has participated in a clinical trial. Your contributions benefit future patients who are diagnosed with cancer.

    View a summary of the recently published APT clinical trial results.

    Patient advocates review clinical and translational research

    At the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers, breast cancer patients are not only the beneficiaries of research advances; in a patient-centered approach, they help guide the research itself. The Breast Cancer Advocacy Group (BCAG), composed chiefly of breast cancer patients and survivors, provide a patient perspective to the Center's clinical investigators. The group reviews concepts and protocols for clinical trials from a patient’s perspective. For example, the advocates might recommend revisions to research questions so they more closely reflect the concerns of patients.

    The advocates are also members of project teams for the Breast SPORE (Specialized Program of Research Excellence) from the National Cancer Institute, reviewing applications for institutional and SPORE-funded Career Development Awards, and working hand-in-hand with investigators to design research studies.

    Learn more about breast cancer patient advocates, including how to become one.