• Pediatric Cancer Types

    Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Find detailed, up-to-date information for many common and rare types of pediatric-onset cancer, and learn about how we support and care for our pediatric cancer patients before, during and after treatment.

Showing 1-42 of 42 items

A

  • Adrenocortical Carcinoma
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    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare cancer that forms in the outer layer of the adrenal gland, which release hormones such as adrenaline to control heart rate, blood pressure, and other body functions. Learn about adrenocortical carcinoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with this rare cancer before, during, and after treatment.

  • Astrocytoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Astrocytoma is a tumor that begins in the brain or spinal cord in small, star-shaped cells called astrocytes. Learn about astrocytoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with astrocytoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • AT/RT - Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    An atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor, often called AT/RT, is a very rare and fast-growing tumor of the central nervous system. Learn about AT/RT and find information on how we support and care for children with this rare cancer before, during, and after treatment.

B

  • Brain Tumors
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    A brain tumor refers to the growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign or malignant. Learn about brain tumors and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with brain tumors before, during, and after treatment.

C

  • Cerebellar Low-Grade Astrocytoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    A cerebellar low-grade astrocytoma is a slow-growing brain tumor that occurs in the cerebellum, a region in the lower-back portion of the brain that controls movement and balance. Learn about cerebellar astrocytomas and find information on how we support and care for children with cerebellar astrocytomas before, during, and after treatment.

  • Chondroblastoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Chondroblastoma is a rare, benign bone tumor comprised of cells known as chondroblasts, which produce cartilage. It is usually found in the ends of long bones, usually in the lower part of the body. Learn about chondroblastoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with chondroblastoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Choroid Plexus Tumor
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Choroid plexus tumor is a rare type of cancer that occurs in the ventricles of the brain. It usually occurs in children younger than 2 years. Learn about choroid plexus tumors in children and find information on how we support and care for children with choroid plexus tumor before, during, and after treatment.

  • Craniopharyngioma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Craniopharyngioma is a benign brain tumor that may be considered malignant because it can damage the hypothalamus, which is the area of the brain that controls body temperature, hunger, and thirst. Learn about craniopharyngioma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with craniopharyngioma before, during, and after treatment.

D

  • Desmoid Tumor
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    A desmoid tumor is a tumor of the tissue that surrounds muscles, usually in the abdomen. A desmoid tumor rarely spreads to other parts of the body. It may be called aggressive fibromatosis when the tumor is outside the abdomen. Learn about desmoid tumor and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with desmoid tumor before, during, and after treatment.

  • Dysembryplastic Neuroepithelial Tumor (DNT)
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    This group of tumors occurs in the tissues that cover the brain and spinal cord. They occur in the cerebrum, the part of the brain that controls thought, movement and sensation. Learn about dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors in children and find information on how we support and care for children with DNT before, during, and after treatment.

E

  • Ependymoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Ependymoma is a type of brain tumor that may arise in the ventricles of the brain or in the spinal cord. It is also called an ependymal tumor. Learn about ependymoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with ependymoma before, during, and after treatment.

F

  • Fibrosarcoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Fibrosarcoma is a type of soft tissue sarcoma that begins in fibrous tissue, which holds bones, muscles, and other organs in place. Learn about fibrosarcoma in children and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with fibrosarcoma before, during, and after treatment.

G

  • Germ Cell Tumor of the Brain
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    A germ cell tumor of the brain arises from primitive developing cells that form in the embryo and may otherwise become the reproductive system. Learn about brain tumors in children and find information on how we support and care for children with germ cell tumors of the brain before, during, and after treatment.

  • Glioblastoma Multiforme
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a fast-growing type of central nervous system tumor that forms from supportive tissue of the brain and spinal cord and has cells that look very different from normal cells. Learn about glioblastoma multiforme and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with GBM before, during, and after treatment.

  • Glioma, Diffuse Pontine
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    A diffuse pontine glioma or brain stem glioma is a malignant tumor that arises in the supportive tissue of the part of the brain that controls many vital functions. Learn about diffuse pontine glioma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with brain stem glioma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Glioma, Low Grade
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    A low-grade glioma is a slow-growing cancer of the brain that begins in glial cells, which surround and support nerve cells. Learn about low-grade gliomas and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with low-grade gliomas before, during, and after treatment.

  • Gliomatosis Cerebri
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Gliomatosis cerebri is a highly aggressive, rare form of malignant astrocytic tumor. It begins in the brain or spinal cord in small, star-shaped cells called astrocytes. Learn about gliomatosis cerebri in children and find information on how we support and care for children with gliomatosis cerebri before, during, and after treatment.

H

  • Hepatoblastoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Hepatoblastoma is a type of liver tumor that occurs in infants and children. Learn about liver cancer in children and find information on how we support and care for children with hepatoblastoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Histiocytosis
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Histiocytosis is a group of rare diseases that most often affect young children. The histiocytoses are not considered to be cancers, although they can be life-threatening and treatment can involve chemotherapy. Learn about histocytosis and find information on how we support and care for children with histiocytosis before, during, and after treatment.

K

  • Kidney Tumor
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Kidney cancer includes renal cell carcinoma, renal pelvis carcinoma, and Wilms' tumor, which is a type of kidney cancer that usually develops in children under age 5. Learn about childhood kidney cancer and find information on how we support and care for children with kidney cancer before, during, and after treatment.

L

  • Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic (ALL)
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a fast-growing type of blood cancer in which too many lymphoblasts (immature white blood cells) are found in the blood and bone marrow. Learn about acute lymphoblastic leukemia and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with ALL before, during, and after treatment.

  • Leukemia, Acute Myeloid (AML)
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a quickly progressing disease in which too many immature white blood cells (not lymphocytes) are found in the blood and bone marrow. Learn about acute myelogenous leukemia and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with AML before, during, and after treatment.

  • Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous (CML)
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    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a slowly progressing disease in which too many white blood cells are made in the bone marrow. Learn about chronic myelogenous leukemia and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with CML before, during, and after treatment.

  • Liposarcoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Liposarcoma is a rare cancer of the fat cells. Learn about liposarcoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with liposarcoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Liver Cancer
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Primary liver cancer forms in the tissues of the liver. Secondary liver cancer spreads to the liver from another part of the body. Learn about liver cancer and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with liver cancer before, during, and after treatment.

  • Lymphoma, Burkitt
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Burkitt lymphoma is a fast-growing type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that occurs most often in children and young adults. The disease may affect the jaw, central nervous system, kidneys, ovaries, or other organs. Learn about Burkitt lymphoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with Burkitt lymphoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Lymphoma, Hodgkin
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Hodgkin lymphoma is a cancer of the immune system. Symptoms include the painless enlargement of lymph nodes, fever, weight loss, or fatigue. Learn about Hodgkin lymphoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with Hodgkin lymphoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma refers to any of a large group of cancers of the immune system that can occur at any age and are often marked by enlarged lymph nodes, fever, and weight loss. Learn about non-Hodgkin lymphoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with non-Hodgkin before, during, and after treatment.

M

  • Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma is a soft tissue sarcoma that usually occurs in the limbs, most commonly the legs, and may also occur in the abdomen. Learn about malignant fibrous histiocytoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with sarcoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Myelodysplastic Syndrome
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are a group of diseases in which the bone marrow does not make enough healthy blood cells. It is also called preleukemia or smoldering leukemia. Learn about myelodysplastic syndromes and find information on how we support and care for children and teens before, during, and after treatment.

N

  • Nephroblastoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Nephroblastoma or Wilms' tumor, is a disease in which cancer cells are found in the kidney, and may spread to the lungs, liver, or nearby lymph nodes. Wilms' tumor usually occurs in children younger than 5 years old. Learn about nephroblastoma and find information on how we support and care for children with nephroblastoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Neuroblastoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Neuroblastoma is a cancer that arises in immature nerve cells and affects mostly infants and children. Learn about neuroblastoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with neuroblastoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Neurofibrosarcoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Neurofibrosarcoma is a malignant tumor that develops in the cells surrounding peripheral nerves. This condition is also known as peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Learn about neurofibrosarcoma and find information on our support and care for children with neurofibrosarcoma before, during, and after treatment.

O

  • Osteosarcoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Osteosarcoma is a cancer of the bone that usually affects the large bones of the arm or leg. It occurs most commonly in young people and affects more males than females. Learn about osteosarcoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with osteosarcoma before, during, and after treatment.

R

  • Retinoblastoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Retinoblastoma is a cancer that forms in the tissues of the retina. It usually occurs in children younger than 5 years. It may be hereditary or sporadic. Learn about retinoblastoma and find information on how we support and care for children with retinoblastoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Rhabdoid Tumor of the Kidney
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Rhabdoid tumor of the kidney is a malignant tumor of the kidney. These tumors usually occur in children younger than 2 years. Learn about rhabdoid tumors and find information on how we support and care for children with rhabdoid tumors of the kidney before, during, and after treatment.

  • Rhabdomyosarcoma
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a cancer that forms in the soft tissues in a type of muscle called striated muscle. This type of cancer can occur anywhere in the body. Learn about rhabdomyosarcoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with rhabdomyosarcoma before, during, and after treatment.

S

  • Sarcoma, Ewing
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Ewing sarcoma is a type of cancer that forms in bone or soft tissue. It is also called peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor or pPNET. Learn about Ewing sarcoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with Ewing sarcoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Sarcoma, Soft Tissue
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Soft tissue sarcoma refers to cancer that begins in the muscle, fat, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, or other supporting tissue of the body. Learn about soft tissue sarcoma and find information on how we support and care for people with soft tissue sarcoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Sarcoma, Synovial
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant tumor that develops in the synovial membrane of the joints. Learn about synovial sarcoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with synovial sarcoma before, during, and after treatment.

  • Spinal Cord Tumor
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    A spinal cord tumor refers to the growth of abnormal cells in the of nerve tissue that runs from the base of the skull down the back. Spinal cord tumors can be benign (or malignant. Learn about spinal cord tumors and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with spinal cord tumors before, during, and after treatment.

W

  • Wilm's Tumor
  • Dana-Farber / Children's Hospital Cancer Center logo

    Wilms' tumor is a disease in which cancer cells are found in the kidney, and may spread to the lungs, liver, or nearby lymph nodes. Wilms' tumor usually occurs in children younger than 5 years old. Learn about Wilms' tumor and find information on how we support and care for children with Wilms' tumor before, during, and after treatment.

Showing 1-42 of 42 items
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