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The Center for Cancer Precision Medicine Team

  • CCPM team members
  • CCPM Faculty

    Bruce Johnson, MD
    Bruce Johnson, MD
    Director

    Bruce Johnson received his MD degree from the University of Minnesota in 1979, and his postgraduate training at the University of Chicago and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). After serving at NCI, where he most recently headed the Lung Cancer Biology Section, he joined Dana-Farber in 1999. Dr. Johnson currently leads the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Lung Cancer Program and is the chief clinical research officer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

    View Dr. Johnson's Harvard Catalyst Profile


    Eliezer Van Allen, MD
    Eliezer Van Allen, MD
    Computational Director

    Eliezer Van Allen, MD, is an assistant professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, a clinician at Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care, and an associate member at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. His research focuses on computational cancer genomics; the application of new technologies, such as massively parallel sequencing to precision cancer medicine; and resistance to targeted therapeutics.

    As both a computational biologist and a medical oncologist, Dr. Van Allen has specific expertise in clinical computational oncology and the development of algorithms to analyze and interpret genomic data for clinically focused questions. Overall, his research will make important contributions to the field of precision cancer medicine and resistance to targeted therapeutics via expertise and study in translational and clinical bioinformatics.

    Originally from Los Angeles, CA, Dr. Van Allen studied Symbolic Systems at Stanford University, obtained his MD from UCLA, and completed a residency in internal medicine at UCSF before coming to Boston and completing a medical oncology fellowship in the Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care program.

    Visit Dr. Van Allen's lab website


    Nikhil Wagle, MD
    Nikhil Wagle, MD
    Deputy Director

    Nikhil Wagle, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, a medical oncologist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and an institute member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. He is the Deputy Directory of the Center for Cancer Precision Medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He received his MD from Harvard Medical School and completed his residency training in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where he also served as chief medical resident, and completed his fellowship training in hematology/oncology in the Dana-Farber/Partners program.

    Dr. Wagle leads a translational research program in breast cancer and precision cancer medicine. The major goals of his work are to better understand the biology of metastatic breast cancer and to develop new ways to overcome or prevent drug resistance in patients with advanced breast cancer. Ultimately, his research aims to identify characteristics of tumors that might improve clinical decision-making for patients with advanced cancer.

    He is also the Director of Count Me In, a nonprofit research organization that aims to transform cancer care by empowering cancer patients to accelerate cancer research by sharing their samples, their medical information, and their voices. The program’s first project, The Metastatic Breast Cancer Project (mbcproject.org), is a nationwide patient-driven research initiative that engages patients with advanced breast cancer through social media and seeks to empower them to accelerate cancer research through sharing their samples and clinical information. The project’s outreach program, developed in collaboration with advocacy organizations and patients, serves to connect thousands of patients around the U.S. with metastatic breast cancer research, allowing them to participate regardless of where they live. Additional projects for patients with angiosarcoma, metastatic prostate cancer, esophageal and stomach cancer, and brain cancer have also been launched. Over the next several years, Count Me In aims to launch projects in all major cancer types, as well as rare and pediatric cancers.

    Visit Dr. Wagle's lab website


    Scott Carter, PhD
    Scott Carter, PhD
    Faculty

    Scott Carter, PhD, works closely with Boston-area physicians to design and execute studies of cancer initiation, drug resistance, and metastasis using genomics technology applied to cancer-tissue specimens collected at various stages of disease progression. He has developed several novel computational methods to analyze these data sets and make inferences about clonal evolution underlying cancer progression. Dr. Carter has also developed software tools that are significantly increasing the impact of his work by making those methods available to the broader research community. These tools include HAPSEG, ABSOLUTE, CapSeg, Allelic CapSeg, and Phylogic.

    View Dr. Carter's Harvard Catalyst Profile


    Oliver Jonas, PhD
    Oliver Jonas, PhD
    Faculty

    Oliver Jonas, PhD, developed microdevices that are implanted directly into tumors and measure how the tumor responds to 30 different chemotherapies. These devices carry microdoses of each therapy, which are released into small, confined regions of tumor. Each therapy interacts with the tumor in its native microenvironment. The effect of each therapy is then assessed using a variety of readouts, including immunohistochemistry, mass spectrometry and RNAseq. These data can then be used to identify which therapy works optimally for a given patient.

    Visit Dr. Jonas's lab website


    Jens Lohr, MD, PhD
    Jens Lohr, MD, PhD
    Faculty

    Jens Lohr, MD, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a medical oncologist at Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care. His research focuses on tumor evolution and how drug responses are shaped by the tumor microenvironment, with a particular interest in multiple myeloma. The Lohr lab has developed innovative “liquid biopsy” technologies to comprehensively characterize multiple myeloma through cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating myeloma cells (CMMCs) with exquisite sensitivity.

    Dr. Lohr obtained his MD from Ruprecht-Karls University in Heidelberg, Germany, where he also obtained training as an immunologist. He completed a residency in internal medicine at UCSF, and a medical oncology fellowship at the Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care program. He performed postdoctoral work in immunology at UCSF (San Francisco, CA) and in cancer genomics at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard (Cambridge, MA). Dr. Lohr is Board-certified in internal medicine, medical oncology, and hematology, and practices as a clinician at Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care. Dr. Lohr is specialty chief editor of Precision Medicine for the journal Frontiers in Medicine.

    Visit Dr. Lohr's lab website


    Asaf Rotem, PhD
    Asaf Rotem, PhD
    Associate Director

    Prior to assuming his position as associate director of the center, Asaf Rotem, PhD, was head of the Innovation Laboratory at the Center for Cancer Precision Medicine at Dana-Farber. Under his leadership, the laboratory focused on innovative technologies aiming to study genomics, resistance, and vulnerability of tumors derived from individual patients. He helped develop technology that allowed the testing of several anti-cancer drugs on patient-derived tumor cells to match the best drug to an individual. Practicing this technology, Dr. Rotem found genes that contribute to cancer, and drugs that might target cancer cells in a specific manner.

    Dr. Rotem completed his graduate studies at the Weizmann Institute and the Technion in Israel. He has been involved in the establishment of companies, has been a consultant, and has served on a board of directors. He held a post-doctoral research fellow position at Harvard Medical School and was an instructor in Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology.

    View Dr. Rotem's PubMed page


    Sébastien Vigneau, PhD
    Sébastien Vigneau, PhD
    Head of Innovation Lab

    Sébastien Vigneau, PhD, joined the Center for Cancer Precision Medicine (CCPM) in 2018 as the head of the Innovation Lab. His previous background and expertise are in developmental and molecular biology, epigenetics, and bioinformatics. He completed his PhD on X chromosome inactivation at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, after which he moved to Philadelphia to study genomic imprinting and gene expression regulation at the University of Pennsylvania. Since 2013, he has been at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where his main research interests have been gene expression, single-cell RNA sequencing, and cancer.

    As head of the CCPM Innovation Lab, Dr. Vigneau is leading efforts to map gene expression and cell type composition in various types of tumors, with the aim of discovering mechanisms that can be exploited to treat cancer. In parallel, he is also engaged in the development of new technologies that will make this research effort more efficient.

    View Dr. Vigneau's Harvard Catalyst Profile

    CCPM Team

    Nichole Straub, BS

    Administrative Director

    Innovation Lab

    Grace Grimaldi, BS

    Research Technician

    Jingyi Wu, BS

    Research Technician

    Jason Yeung, BS

    Research Technician

    Pathology Team

    Miraj Patel, MS

    Pathology Team Lead

    Judy Chen, BS

    Pathology Technician

    Stephanie Inga, BS

    Pathology Technician

    Colin Mackichan, BS

    Senior Pathology Technician

    Project Management Team

    Karla Helvie, MA

    Project Management Team Lead

    Laura DelloStritto, MPH

    Research Project Manager

    Allison McHenry Frangieh, MS, MPH

    Research Project Manager

    Angie Mayorga, BA

    Research Project Manager

    Shreevidya Periyasamy, BS

    Research Assistant