Osteosarcoma

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    Osteosarcoma is a cancer of the bone that usually affects the large bones of the arm or leg. It occurs most commonly in young people and affects more males than females. Learn about osteosarcoma and find information on how we support and care for children and teens with osteosarcoma before, during, and after treatment.

The Solid Tumor Center at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center treats children and teens with a variety of solid malignancies, including bone and soft tissue tumors, liver and kidney tumors, neuroblastomas, retinoblastomas and rare tumors. Our doctors provide unparalleled expertise in the diagnosis, treatment and management of these diseases.

Your child's care team will include pediatric oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgeons, pathologists, radiologists, and nurses with expertise in treating your child's specific type of cancer.

Our physicians are focused on family-centered care: From your first visit, you'll work with a team of professionals who are committed to supporting your family's needs. We consider you and your child integral parts of the care team. Our specialists will collaborate with you to customize a treatment plan that takes the needs of your child and your family into account.

As well as providing access to a range of innovative clinical trials through Dana-Farber/Boston Children's, we are New England's Phase I referral center for the Children's Oncology Group, which means we're able to offer clinical trials unavailable at other regional centers.

Your child will have access to long-term treatment and childhood cancer survivor support through Dana-Farber's David B. Perini, Jr. Quality of Life Clinic.

From diagnosis through treatment and survivorship, our team will be able to answer all of your questions about your child's care.

Find out more about our Solid Tumor Center, including the diseases we treat and our specialized programs for bone and soft tissue tumors, liver tumors, neuroblastoma, rare tumors, and retinoblastoma.

Osteosarcoma

Osteosarcoma is the most common type of bone cancer in children and young adults. It usually occurs in the long bones, such as the arms or legs, though it can also occur in the pelvis, spine, jaw or other locations in the body.

How Dana-Farber/Boston Children's approaches osteosarcoma in children

Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center was one of the first centers in the United States to use adjuvant chemotherapy and perform limb salvage surgery for patients with osteosarcoma. Our multidisciplinary approach through our Bone and Soft Tissue Program ensures in-depth discussion of each case and personalized treatment plans for every patient. We integrate expertise from pediatric oncologists, oncologic orthopedists, pediatric specialists, psychologists, social workers, and oncologic surgeons.

Treatments for osteosarcoma in children

Treatments for osteocarcoma may involve a combination of therapies including surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. In most cases, children receive chemotherapy before surgery (neoadjuvant), a surgical procedure to remove the tumor and additional chemotherapy after surgery (adjuvant). Treatment options will vary greatly, depending on your child's situation. Your child's doctor and other members of your care team will discuss the options with you in-depth. Prompt medical attention and aggressive therapy are important for the best prognosis.

Osteosarcoma surgery

Depending on the size and location of the tumor and whether the tumor has spread, your child may receive one of the surgical treatments necessary to combat it including limb salvage surgery, amputation, or a rotationplasty. If the osteosarcoma has spread to other parts of the body, such as the lungs, additional surgery may be required, and our oncologic surgeons will remove any metastases that may have formed.

Chemotherapy for osteosarcoma

Chemotherapy is a group of drugs that interfere with the cancer cell's ability to grow or reproduce. Different groups of chemotherapy drugs work in varied ways to fight cancer cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy is systemic treatment, meaning it is introduced to the bloodstream and travels throughout the body to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy can be given orally, as an injection into the muscle or fat tissue, directly to the bloodstream, or with a needle directly into the fluid surrounding the spine.

Osteosarcoma research and clinical trials

We also are conducting numerous research studies to help better understand and treat osteosarcoma. Our researchers are directing and participating in national and international clinical trials to develop new treatments for patients with newly diagnosed, non-metastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma – using surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy to more effectively overcome cancer.

Learn more
Find more in-depth information on osteosarcoma on the Dana-Farber/Boston Children's website.

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